International Studies & Programs

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Published: Monday, 27 Jun 2016
Author: Cheryl Ann Benner
Department: Office for Education Abroad

After being a part of this program, it has really reaffirmed my passion in wanting to become apart of the healthcare system. I want to be a reconstructive surgeon that donates their time to under privileged communities that cannot afford the help on their own. While being able to experience the surgeries, births of babies, and the experience of working in an under privileged community - I have reassured myself that I have chosen the best career path for myself.



Published: Monday, 27 Jun 2016
Author: Cheryl Ann Benner
Department: Office for Education Abroad

This program not only solidified my passion for medicine but also opened my eyes to a different culture and their ways of life, plus I can speak a little Spanish now. I hope I am able to study abroad again soon.



Published: Monday, 27 Jun 2016
Author: Cheryl Ann Benner
Department: Office for Education Abroad

As I reflect on my time now, however, it is incredible to think of the real world application of my first year curriculum in the MBA program. One company visit that stands out as one I can relate back to a number of first year courses was at an Amazon fulfillment center outside of Munich, Germany.



Published: Monday, 27 Jun 2016
Author: Cheryl Ann Benner
Department: Office for Education Abroad

I had the honor of shadowing a physician that allowed me to be very hands on in assessing patients. Needless to say it was awesome! In her room there was a nurse who took vitals and asked simple questions to figure out the reason for the visit much like in the U.S. It was very rewarding to see her interact, diagnose, inform and resolve the issue at hand.



Published: Monday, 27 Jun 2016
Author: Cheryl Ann Benner
Department: Office for Education Abroad

Every morning, we observed patient visits, surgeries, and deliveries, an opportunity I would have never been able to receive in the U.S., where such shadowing opportunities are unheard of for undergraduate students. Seeing actual patients in a clinical setting truly enhanced my passion for people of all backgrounds and my desire to treat them as a physician.



Published: Monday, 27 Jun 2016
Author: Cheryl Ann Benner
Department: Office for Education Abroad

While learning about Japanese culture, we were told that a lot of company executives earn their role because it was passed down to them from another generation, rather than earned like it generally is in America. My first thought when hearing this was "how could that possibly work? How could a company succeed?" But it sure did work! Some of the most prestigious and well-known companies that we visited were on their 3rd or 4th generation in the family.



Published: Monday, 27 Jun 2016
Author: Cheryl Ann Benner
Department: Office for Education Abroad

In a majority of my classes, I was one of only maybe three native English speakers, with the rest being French speaking students. I quickly befriended various groups of French students. We often compared life in Europe to life in America, highlighting differences in areas such as educational systems, politics, and societal expectations. I got to know some of them on a deeper level when they offered to take me on a weekend trip to the chateaux of the Loire Valley.



Published: Monday, 27 Jun 2016
Author: Cheryl Ann Benner
Department: Office for Education Abroad

My favorite visit was in Vienna to see OPEC. Here, we had a great Q & A session with an OPEC representative about the current oil situation in the world, the economic status of OPEC nations including the turmoil in Venezuela and how competitor nations like the US and Russia could threaten the oil industry in the future. Overall, we had a very enlightening experience.



Published: Monday, 27 Jun 2016
Author: Cheryl Ann Benner
Department: Office for Education Abroad

Going to Japan has taught me that Japan is a collective society. This means that the Japanese achieve success or failure collectively, which is very team focused. During the stay I learned that following all of the rules is very important to a collective society. In Japan I noticed that the people are very patient to follow every rule. This has helped me gain perspective on the reason we have rules.



Published: Monday, 27 Jun 2016
Author: Cheryl Ann Benner
Department: Office for Education Abroad

Japanese automotive companies are known for having the best quality. Toyota has been #1 automotive company for many years. I did not expect this idea of quality to carry over into basically every aspect of Japanese culture. From Shinshindo baked goods to Fujitec elevators and escalators to KRT's inspections, quality is definitely engraved in the culture, which I have thoroughly enjoyed.